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November 01, 2003

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Comments

Carolyn

Your slices of mozzarella with basil look so good. I am trying my hand at making mozzarella and then ricotta out of its whey. So far, I have great tasting rubber that doesn't melt--even with a torch!

Alberto

Wow, hand made mozzarella sounds like a challenge! I've never tried myself, never needed to with all the great mozzarella makers in Naples and surrounding but I'm intrigued. What kind of process do you use?

PATRICIA BAILEY

I HAVE TRIED IN VAIN TO FIND THE RECIPE MY GRANDMOTHER USED TO MAKE USING THE HEART AND LUNGS OF A COW DONE IN SAUCE- CAN ANYONE HELP?

Kylie

Have you a reccomendation for a place in Italy to see Buffalo Mozzarella being made

Alberto

Kylie,

how urgent is it? If you wait till end of this week I'll have a post up just about that, with the address of a great place south of Salerno.

Dorothy

Hi, We were given a mozzarella recipe by an italian woman, and we successfully made it about five times, we were using whey from previous attempts, - since then we have never been able to make the curd stretch (despite trying numorous times) - it just seems to crumble once put in hot water. We were wondering if you had a recipe for making the curd please? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Alberto

Hi Dorothy,

I do not have a recipe unfortunately – never made mozzarella myself – but I can take a few guesses. I would imagine the curds are not acid enough yet to stretch. If you have a way to test the acidity (pH) of the curds (and the whey they are into) it should be pretty easy to test if that is the problem. During my food chemistry course at university I learned the pH has to be between 3.8 and 3.5 for the curds to stretch properly.

The acidification should happen through the exposure to the whey and the bacterias in there. I know from mozzarella producers that sometimes a whey culture can die for a series of reasons: contamination from other bacteria/yeastsand excessive whey heating (I believe the acidifying bacteria survive at 75-80°C but not higher) seem to be the most common ones.

Hope this helps.

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